Piano Practice for the Elephants Contest: Become a Matching Donor Today!

The Practice for the Elephants Contest is under way at the Cape Ann Piano Studio!
My piano students are practicing piano to raise money to continue to foster our baby elephants, who have been orphaned because of illegal poaching.

Keep reading to find out how you can become a matching donor!

Our Elephants!
Our Elephants!

About the contest:

Students earn two cents for every minute practiced over the course of 4 weeks. At the end, we total up the minutes to figure out how much each student has raised. Students’ sponsors can be parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, close friends of the family.

But new this year, students have matching donors: each matching donor is paired with a particular student and will match what that student earns.

Each student generally earns between $8–$15 for practicing. Can you match what they earn? I have 14 young students participating in the contest, and they all need matching donors. The kids are so excited that their contribution will be doubled! Our goal is to raise enough to continue to foster our 10 baby elephants. (It’s $50 a year per orphaned elephant.)

If you’d like to be a matching donor for a great cause, please contact me and I will pair you up with a student! 

Cape Ann Piano Studio Spring Recital, June, 2015
Cape Ann Piano Studio Spring Recital, June, 2015

Why Pianos and Elephants?

As pianists we are very aware of the history of using ivory for piano keys and that the manufacture of pianos once contributed to the trade in ivory. But today, piano technicians use polymers and mixtures of plastics to create the look and feel of ivory for our piano keys, bypassing entirely the illegal trade in ivory elephant tusks.

Where Our Donations Go

The donations collected go to sponsor abandoned baby elephant cubs whose mother or father was killed from illegal poaching of ivory in Africa. The orphaned baby elephants are raised and kept safe for later release by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Foundation in Nairobi, Kenya where it operates the Tsavo East National Park.

Click here for more details on the contest and on the Foundation.
Please also visit the The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust website.
You can also follow the Trust on FB: https://www.facebook.com/thedswt
Here’s another website, iworry.org, where you can take action toward ending the ivory trade.

Meet One of Our Elephants

Rorogoi (girl)
Here’s Rorogoi (girl).

 

This wonderful and amazing contest was created by fellow piano instructor, Penny Lazarus.

Check out the theremin on Google today!

OMG! On Google right now, Clara Rockmore playing the theremin! How totally cool. Check it out!

http://www.google.com

Wanna know more about the theremin? Go to my previous post and read all about it.
http://wp.me/p2ktnP-3h4

 

Lev_Termen_playing_-_cropped
Leon Theremin, inventor of the theremin playing one of the first models that he built.

 

 

Piano Practice for the Elephants Contest: Become a Matching Donor Today!

The Practice for the Elephants Contest is in the final stretch as my piano students begin Week 4 of practicing piano to raise money to foster baby elephants, who have been orphaned due to the illegal poaching of elephants for their ivory tusks.
Keep reading to find out how you can become a matching donor!

elephantsign
Last year’s sign the kids made at the recital.

 

About the contest:

Students earn two cents for every minute practiced over the course of 4 weeks. At the end, we total up the minutes to figure out how much each student has raised. Students’ sponsors can be parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, close friends of the family.

But new this year, students have matching donors: one (or more) paired with a student, who will match what each student earns.

So far we have matching donors for all students—we need 3 more then every student will have one! Each student generally earns between $10-$20 for practicing. Can you match what they earn? The kids are so excited that their contribution will be doubled! Our goal is to raise enough to continue to foster our 6 baby elephants, and, if there are extra funds we will foster another baby elephant. (It’s $50 a year per orphaned elephant.)

If you’d like to be a matching donor for a great cause, please contact me and I will pair you up with a student! 

Last year's recital!
Last year’s recital!

Why Pianos and Elephants?

As pianists we are very aware of the history of using ivory for piano keys and that the manufacture of pianos once contributed to the trade in ivory. But today, piano technicians use polymers and mixtures of plastics to create the look and feel of ivory for our piano keys, bypassing entirely the illegal trade in ivory elephant tusks

Where Our Donations Go

The donations collected go to sponsor abandoned baby elephant cubs whose mother or father was killed from illegal poaching of ivory in Africa. The orphaned baby elephants are raised and kept safe for later release by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Foundation in Nairobi, Kenya where it operates the Tsavo East National Park.

Click here for more details on the contest and on the Foundation.
Please also visit the The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust website.
Here’s another website, iworry.org, where you can take action toward ending the ivory trade.

Our Elephants

Barsilinga (boy)
Barsilinga (boy)
Jasiri (boy)
Lima Lima (girl)
Lima Lima (girl)
Rorogoi (girl)
Rorogoi (girl)

 

Chemi Chemi (boy)
Chemi Chemi (boy)
Sonje (girl, left)
Sonje (girl, left)

This wonderful and amazing contest was created by fellow piano instructor, Penny Lazarus.

8 Things Top Practicers Do Differently (from creativity post website)

http://www.creativitypost.com/psychology/8_things_top_practicers_do_differently

This is an article about a study done at the University of Austin to learn more about specific practice habits of piano majors—who were the best players and most effective learners. Really cool.

Granted this is a study with collegiate piano majors, but I think these findings are good tips for all of us, young and old alike!

Check out the top 8 strategies that led to the most success. (I also like the part about instilling kids with some sort of a work ethic that comes in handy in the future. Totally true.)

What I especially find interesting is the part about how many times the participants played the passage incorrectly: “the more times they played it incorrectly, the worse their ranking tended to be.”

“The researchers note that the most striking difference between the top three pianists and the rest, was how they handled mistakes.”

Great quote at the end of the article:

“Success does not consist in never making mistakes but in never making the same one a second time.”
—George Bernard Shaw

And this one is one of my favorites, I think about it a lot:

“Man has no nobler or more valuable possession than time.”
—Ludwig van Beethoven

8 Things Top Practicers Do Differently (from http://www.creativitypost.com)

 

Gordon College Piano Sale Next Weekend!

Calling all parents, adult students, and anyone else who wants a great deal on basically a new piano!

(on loan to music dept for one year at Gordon, then they have the sale)

Gordon College is having their annual sale of Kawai pianos, which Kawai loans to music department for one year, then they have the sale. Two of my students have purchased a piano at these sales and they are very happy! They’re mainly Kawai pianos in brand-new condition, but there’s also other brands, new and used, incredible deals: read more about it here at the Gordon College Dept of Music site.

And be sure and tell them I sent you! 🙂

 

Everything you ever wanted to know about metronomes but were afraid to ask…

What! A post about metronomes? Ho Hum.
I gotta be honest, I’m not crazy about iPhone/iPad metronome apps only for ONE reason, they’re not loud enough unless you’re running them through speakers. That said, an 11-year-old student introduced me to a great metronome app she uses (when I make her!) on her iPad, best one I’ve seen:

Pro Metronome:

photo
And here’s a list of non-app, some perhaps are somewhat “antiquated” metronomes.

The Korg MA-30, the one I have in my studio. Still cool to kids cos it runs on batteries and has buttons to push.

MA30_1

The bad boy Franz (yes, you plug it in), mine lasted for years (I went through two of them I think) … in fact … sentimental packrat that I am, I still have the second one. It finally died, and I don’t have time to run around finding a clockmaker to fix and calibrate it.

 

images

The Wittner mini, had one of these in college, another great metronome, of the wind-up variety:

Unknown

Call me old-fashioned but I still love these the best, the Seth Thomas wooden metronome, a throwback to the early 1800s (yup, patented by Johann Maelzel in 1815 (Hence, “M.M.” stands for “Maelzel Metronome” so when I write “m.m.” on your music you’ll know where the heck it comes from.) According to Wiki, Beethoven first used m.m. markings in his scores in 1817.

It’s nice and loud, the one I grew up with as a kid (actually, I think we had two, I broke the first one when I threw it across the room in frustration).

images-2

Feel free to share your thrilling metronome memories here too! 🙂

(Seriously, always want info, esp. on apps, or other “physical” metronomes.)

 

What’s the spookiest musical instrument for Halloween?

The Theremin! The who?

Yup, the theremin. The theremin was invented by Russian scientist Léon Theremin, in 1920. It is the world’s very first electronic instrument—what is unique about the theremin is that it’s an instrument you play without touching it; it remains the first and only non-contact instrument.

Lev_Termen_playing_-_cropped
Léon Theremin, playing one of the first theremins that he invented.

 

Here’s a clip of one of my students and me playing a free improvisation for piano and theremin:


To see the full version of our improv, go here:

 

Here’s a pic of the theremin I have, the Etherwave model made by Moog, that you can make from a kit:

250px-Moog_Theremin_Bausatz

 

 

 

 

 

 

Today there are virtuoso thereminists, but not too many. (Students! if you learn to play the theremin like Clara, you’ll always have work … but don’t give up the piano!)

Here’s a video of arguably the best virtuoso thereminist who ever lived, Clara Rockmore, playing The Swan by Camille Saint-Saëns. She was Léon’s protégée.


And for you fans of the British mystery series, Midsomer Murders, yes, that’s a theremin you hear for the theme music, played by Celia Sheen:


If you want to know all about the theremin and its history, a fantastic documentary about the theremin and its inventor* is Theremin: An Electronic Odyssey. It’s a bit hard to rent now, not on Netflix or Amazon, but usually can be found in libraries and is for purchase new or used on Amazon. I have it (on VHS!) for any of my students interested in watching it! 🙂

*Cool fact: Léon was snatched up by the KGB from New York City, where he lived,  in 1938. The filmmaker of the documentary went to Russia to find him and bring him back to NYC, where he was reunited with Clara Rockmore, after more than 50 years, in 1991.

220px-Theremin-_An_Electronic_Odyssey_FilmPoster

 

 

 

Captain Broccoli Explains Music Theory!

Ok, Monday morning music geek here…

Captain Broccoli explains music theory on YouTube!

A bit advanced for beginner students—the first video starts with diatonic triads. But check it out, fun!
(The playlist is actually a good review for those of us rusty, say, on figured bass and secondary dominants.)

Cape Ann Piano Studio Annual Spring Recital

My young piano students will be performing in their annual recital on Saturday, June 14, at 3 pm at the First Universalist Church of Essex.
It’s free and open to the public, all are welcome to attend! The church is also handicapped accessible.
My students will play original pieces by Stravinsky and Bartók (natch!), and arrangements of Tchaikovsky, Saint-Saëns, Mozart, Haydn, and of course Beethoven, as well as popular and traditional music as well.
Come put a smile on your face watching young children share their music! 🙂