Cape Ann Piano Studio Annual Spring Recital!

Tomorrow is the Annual Spring Recital of all of my piano students, and all are welcome! Come and listen to students play pieces from Michael Jackson to Igor Stravinsky! Then hang out for juice or coffee and treats downstairs.

Cape Ann Piano Studio Annual Spring Recital
Saturday, June 17, 4 p.m.
First Universalist Church of Essex.
Free and open to the public, handicapped accessible.
For more info, call (978) 491-1658

And this year the students practiced 9,227 minutes and raised nearly $400 for the elephant orphans, so we will be fostering 8 babies, rescued and cared for by The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust. Learn more about the vital and dedicated work that they do at their Facebook page, where you will find wonderful videos about all that the Trust does: today’s video is all about the orphan babies and what their days are like!

 

Last year’s Spring Recital
Little Dupotto, she’s one of our elephant fosters.

Annual Practice for the Elephants: Become a Matching Donor Today!

Cape Ann Piano Studio’s Annual Practice for the Elephants has just ended—my students practice for the month of May each year for this worthy cause. They practice to raise money to foster baby elephants, who have been orphaned due to the illegal poaching of elephants for their ivory tusks.
Keep reading to find out how you can match the students’ earnings!

Last year’s Annual Spring Recital

About Practicing for the Elephants

Students earn two cents for every minute practiced over the course of 4 weeks. At the end, we total up the minutes to figure out how much each student has raised. Students’ sponsors can be parents, grandparents, teachers and friend, aunts, uncles, anyone!

If any of you would like to be a matching donor for a student (average money raised per student is about $10-12) please contact me. Your match makes each student feel even more proud of their accomplishment. 🙂
It’s $50 a year to foster an orphaned elephant at the DSWT. Your contribution matching a student’s total earnings for practicing for a month goes to an important cause: saving the African elephant from extinction.

If you’d like to be a matching donor for a great cause, please contact me and I will pair you up with a student! 

Water Color by Angela Sheldrick

Why Pianos and Elephants?

As pianists we are very aware of the history of using ivory for piano keys and that the manufacture of pianos once contributed to the trade in ivory. But today, piano technicians use polymers and mixtures of plastics to create the look and feel of ivory for our piano keys, bypassing entirely the illegal trade in ivory elephant tusks

Where Our Donations Go

The donations collected go to sponsor abandoned baby elephant cubs whose mother or father was killed from illegal poaching of ivory in Africa. The orphaned baby elephants are raised and kept safe for later release by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Foundation in Nairobi, Kenya where it operates the Tsavo East National Park.
Please also visit the The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust website.
The DSWT on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thedswt/
Here’s another website, iworry.org, where you can take action toward ending the ivory trade.

Elephants We Have Fostered

Barsilinga (boy)
Barsilinga (boy)
Rorogoi (girl)
Rorogoi (girl)

 

Chemi Chemi (boy)
Chemi Chemi (boy)

 

This wonderful and amazing contest was created by fellow piano instructor, Penny Lazarus.

The Story of Kauro: One of Our Elephant Orphans

The Practice for the Elephants Contest has ended and my piano students have done a great job, practicing during the month of May, with lots of minutes of practicing to raise money to continue to foster our 10 elephant orphans—orphaned because of illegal poaching for their parents’ ivory tusks.

We still need two more matching donors for two of the students:
Keep reading to find out how you can become a matching donor!
Please see below to find out about our charity.

About the contest:

Students earn two cents for every minute practiced over the course of 4 weeks. At the end, we total up the minutes to figure out how much each student has raised. Students’ sponsors can be parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, close friends of the family.

Students also have matching donors: paired with one of my students, you’ll match what that student earned practicing, most kids earn between $10–20.

So far we have matching donors for all but 2 students. Can you match what they earn? The kids are so excited that their contribution will be doubled! Our goal is to raise enough to continue to foster our 10 baby elephants. (It’s $50 a year per elephant baby.)

If you’d like to be a matching donor for a great cause, please contact me and I will pair you up with a student! 

Meet One of Our Elephants

The story of one of our baby elephants, Kauro.

Why Pianos and Elephants?

As pianists we are very aware of the history of using ivory for piano keys and that the manufacture of pianos once contributed to the trade in ivory. But today, piano technicians use polymers and mixtures of plastics to create the look and feel of ivory for our piano keys, bypassing entirely the illegal trade in ivory elephant tusks.

Where Our Donations Go

The donations collected go to sponsor abandoned baby elephant cubs whose mother or father was killed from illegal poaching of ivory in Africa. The orphaned baby elephants are raised and kept safe for later release by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Foundation in Nairobi, Kenya where it operates the Tsavo East National Park.

Click here for more details on the contest and on the Foundation.
Please also visit the The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust website.
You can also follow the Trust on Facebook.
Here’s another website, iworry.org, where you can take action toward ending the ivory trade.

This wonderful and amazing contest was created by fellow piano instructor, Penny Lazarus.

Piano Practice for the Elephants Contest: Become a Matching Donor Today!

The Practice for the Elephants Contest is under way at the Cape Ann Piano Studio!
My piano students are practicing piano to raise money to continue to foster our baby elephants, who have been orphaned because of illegal poaching.

Keep reading to find out how you can become a matching donor!

Our Elephants!
Our Elephants!

About the contest:

Students earn two cents for every minute practiced over the course of 4 weeks. At the end, we total up the minutes to figure out how much each student has raised. Students’ sponsors can be parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, close friends of the family.

But new this year, students have matching donors: each matching donor is paired with a particular student and will match what that student earns.

Each student generally earns between $8–$15 for practicing. Can you match what they earn? I have 14 young students participating in the contest, and they all need matching donors. The kids are so excited that their contribution will be doubled! Our goal is to raise enough to continue to foster our 10 baby elephants. (It’s $50 a year per orphaned elephant.)

If you’d like to be a matching donor for a great cause, please contact me and I will pair you up with a student! 

Cape Ann Piano Studio Spring Recital, June, 2015
Cape Ann Piano Studio Spring Recital, June, 2015

Why Pianos and Elephants?

As pianists we are very aware of the history of using ivory for piano keys and that the manufacture of pianos once contributed to the trade in ivory. But today, piano technicians use polymers and mixtures of plastics to create the look and feel of ivory for our piano keys, bypassing entirely the illegal trade in ivory elephant tusks.

Where Our Donations Go

The donations collected go to sponsor abandoned baby elephant cubs whose mother or father was killed from illegal poaching of ivory in Africa. The orphaned baby elephants are raised and kept safe for later release by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Foundation in Nairobi, Kenya where it operates the Tsavo East National Park.

Click here for more details on the contest and on the Foundation.
Please also visit the The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust website.
You can also follow the Trust on FB: https://www.facebook.com/thedswt
Here’s another website, iworry.org, where you can take action toward ending the ivory trade.

Meet One of Our Elephants

Rorogoi (girl)
Here’s Rorogoi (girl).

 

This wonderful and amazing contest was created by fellow piano instructor, Penny Lazarus.

It’s May at Cape Ann Piano: Time to Practice for the Elephants!

The Practice for the Elephants Contest begins today and runs for 4 weeks through May 27th.

What Is the Practice for the Elephants Contest?

Students practice and earn two cents for every minute practiced over the course of 4 weeks. At the end, students total up the funds they raise, which is used to foster 10 orphaned elephants, we will continue to support the elephants we began to foster last year. If there are extra funds (it’s $50 a year for each elephant) we will donate them to be used by the Trust where most needed. Printed handouts on the contest, as well as the practice sheets and contest rules, are in the studio.
These African elephants have been orphaned due to the illegal poaching of elephants for their ivory. The use of ivory for piano keys once contributed to the ivory trade. Of course, ivory is no longer used; polymers and mixtures of plastics are used instead for the key tops.

Click here for the PDF with more details on contest, and and why we do it!

Click here for more information about the The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust.

This contest was created by friend and fellow piano instructor, Penny Lazarus.

Want to be a matching donor for a piano student practicing for the elephants? Contact me here. If you’re part of the studio, let me know in lessons and I’ll pair you up with a young student!

Two of our baby elephants:

Ndotto relaxing the sun.
Ndotto relaxing the sun.
Mwashoti with his keeper.
Mwashoti with his keeper.

Follow the DSWT on Facebook

Follow the DSWT on Twitter

I will be posting updates on the students’ progress practicing as well as about our foster elephants throughout the contest.

Piano and other teachers interested in this contest, you can contact me here.

 

Dame Daphne Sheldrick with Lominyek and his keeper.

Piano Practice for the Elephants Contest: Become a Matching Donor Today!

The Practice for the Elephants Contest is in the final stretch as my piano students begin Week 4 of practicing piano to raise money to foster baby elephants, who have been orphaned due to the illegal poaching of elephants for their ivory tusks.
Keep reading to find out how you can become a matching donor!

elephantsign
Last year’s sign the kids made at the recital.

 

About the contest:

Students earn two cents for every minute practiced over the course of 4 weeks. At the end, we total up the minutes to figure out how much each student has raised. Students’ sponsors can be parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, close friends of the family.

But new this year, students have matching donors: one (or more) paired with a student, who will match what each student earns.

So far we have matching donors for all students—we need 3 more then every student will have one! Each student generally earns between $10-$20 for practicing. Can you match what they earn? The kids are so excited that their contribution will be doubled! Our goal is to raise enough to continue to foster our 6 baby elephants, and, if there are extra funds we will foster another baby elephant. (It’s $50 a year per orphaned elephant.)

If you’d like to be a matching donor for a great cause, please contact me and I will pair you up with a student! 

Last year's recital!
Last year’s recital!

Why Pianos and Elephants?

As pianists we are very aware of the history of using ivory for piano keys and that the manufacture of pianos once contributed to the trade in ivory. But today, piano technicians use polymers and mixtures of plastics to create the look and feel of ivory for our piano keys, bypassing entirely the illegal trade in ivory elephant tusks

Where Our Donations Go

The donations collected go to sponsor abandoned baby elephant cubs whose mother or father was killed from illegal poaching of ivory in Africa. The orphaned baby elephants are raised and kept safe for later release by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust Foundation in Nairobi, Kenya where it operates the Tsavo East National Park.

Click here for more details on the contest and on the Foundation.
Please also visit the The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust website.
Here’s another website, iworry.org, where you can take action toward ending the ivory trade.

Our Elephants

Barsilinga (boy)
Barsilinga (boy)
Jasiri (boy)
Lima Lima (girl)
Lima Lima (girl)
Rorogoi (girl)
Rorogoi (girl)

 

Chemi Chemi (boy)
Chemi Chemi (boy)
Sonje (girl, left)
Sonje (girl, left)

This wonderful and amazing contest was created by fellow piano instructor, Penny Lazarus.

PBS Airs Episode of “Wild Affair” Featuring Founder of Our Elephant Rescue Organization!

Not to be missed!

Wild Affair: The Elephant Who Found a Mom airs tomorrow night, Wednesday, July 16, on PBS, at 8 pm.

Wild Affair is a new series about the bonds between humans and their animal companions, and the premiere episode is about Daphne Sheldrick, the founder of The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, with whom we help foster orphaned elephants because of illegal poaching. I can’t wait to watch it! 🙂

About The Elephant Who Found a Mom

The story of Aisha, the baby elephant orphan, and Daphne Sheldrick, the woman who became her human foster parent. Their intense bond reaches a crisis point when Daphne leaves Aisha with a babysitter for a few days to attend her daughter’s wedding. Aisha believes she has lost Daphne for good and refuses to eat, leading to her death. Heartbroken, Daphne uses the lessons learned from Aisha’s short life to help her save more than 150 orphans over the next 40 years.

Here’s the link to the PBS info online:

http://www.pbs.org/program/my-wild-affair/

body_my-wild-affair_1.jpg__640x360_q85
Daphne Sheldrick and Aisha.